Temomi Shin Cha Green Tea from Sugimoto America

Temomi Shin ChaTea Information:

Leaf Type:  Green

Where to Buy:  Sugimoto America

Tea Description:

Temomi Shin Cha is one of the rarest and highest quality Japanese green teas. The word temomi means “hand-rolled”. From the meticulous picking of the best young tea leaves to the final process of kneading the leaves to fine needles, the whole practice is done by the hands of elite temomi artisans. A method used in Japan centuries ago, the temomi technique is vanishing due to the adoption of today’s machines to produce tea. Temomi Shin Cha is offered to the Japanese Emperor each year in a ceremony celebrating the first tea of spring.

Learn more about this tea here.

Taster’s Review:

I have tried Shin Cha teas in the past, but I have never had this very rare Temomi Shin Cha tea before.  What an amazing opportunity to try it!

This is one of the finest green teas I’ve yet to try.

The dry leaf is long and elegant.  The photo above almost suggests an appearance of a Japanese Sencha, and … it does look a little bit like that, except that the leaves are longer.  These aren’t a finely cut leaf, they’re the tender, young leaves – whole – that have been assiduously rolled by hand.  Each tiny, beautiful leaf has been rolled into a long, very slender, sleek “needles.”  They’re gorgeous.

Since I do not own a kyusu, I steeped these leaves in my gaiwan.  My gaiwan is not the “standard” gaiwan, it has a fairly wide, shallow chamber and it is the perfect size to accommodate these precious leaves.  How this tea is brewed is very important.  The temperature should be only 100°F – yeah!  I did a double take on that temperature too.  I don’t think I’ve ever encountered a tea where such a low temperature was required!

Fortunately, my Breville One-Touch doubles as a variable tea kettle as well, and while it doesn’t have a setting for a temperature so low, it does show the temperature as it builds and I was able to pull the kettle at 100°F.  The steep time is 2 minutes.  After two minutes, look at the leaves and see if they’ve opened.  They were beginning to open at this point, but not fully open, so I gave the tea one more minute.  After the extra minute, I strained the tea and sat back to enjoy my this rare tea experience!

The color of the tea is very pale.  But even though there isn’t a lot of color to the liquid, there is a LOT of flavor and texture. It is sweet and the texture is thick.  Thicker than any other Japanese green tea I’ve ever tried (Matcha is not included in that statement.)  It is rich and buttery with a strong vegetative taste that is somewhat grassy.  Sweet and grassy.

In the literature that comes along with this tea, it says:

Temomi Shincha is consumed in small amounts, very much akin to enjoying a rich and strong flavored espresso.

And I get that.  No, I’m not tasting espresso here.  But it does have a very strong and forward flavor, just like you might experience if you were to be sipping on an espresso – but without being brash like espresso can be.  Hey, what can I say, I’m not into espresso … I’m a tea drinker through and through.

For the second infusion, I used 130°F water and steeped for only 1 minute.  This cup is not quite as thick as the first was, but it maintains the same level of flavor and the same sweet, grassy, rich taste that I enjoyed in the first cup.  Still buttery, but because it isn’t as thick, it doesn’t seem quite as buttery or creamy as the first cup was.  It still has a really luscious texture though, it’s just a little lighter.  I notice a bit of astringency to this cup.

I brewed my third infusion the same way, but I added 15 seconds onto the infusion time, steeping for 1 minute 15 seconds.  The extra 15 seconds made a difference, and I’m getting that same soft, thick texture that I experienced in the first cup with this cup.  It’s thick and buttery and delightful.

This third cup may be my favorite of the three.  It has the same rich, brothy texture of the first cup, but with a softer vegetative presentation, the flavor is a little softer and this accentuates the creamy texture.

And because I wasn’t quite ready to say goodbye to this tea just yet, I decided to do something that I don’t ordinarily do:  eat the leaves!  I brought the kettle to a boil, and poured the boiling water over the leaves to soak them for five minutes to remove any tannic qualities of the leaves.  So after I finished drinking this tea, I enjoyed a warm salad of tea leaves and a light dressing of sesame oil and orange.  It was tasty!

This is – unquestionably – an exceptional tea and offers not just a journey that’s well worth taking but also represents an opportunity to taste a rare tea that is available only in limited quantities.  I highly, highly recommend this tea to all those who truly love tea.

liberteas

Co-Founder/Co-Creator of SororiTea Sisters, Mad Tea Artist at 52Teas
Anne (aka the Mad Tea Artist) has celebrated her 29th birthday for many years now. She lives in the Pacific Northwest with her hubby and her youngest daughter. Her oldest daughter is married and has bestowed Anne with the proud title of "Gramma" and her grandson is about the cutest boy you ever did see.

Anne started her journey with tea as a casual drinker and became more serious about her tea drinking when she realized that she couldn't drink coffee. Shortly thereafter, she started becoming obsessed with the beverage and she started creating small-batch, artisan blends of tea that she sold online as LiberTEAS. After a few years, she realized she wasn't cut out to be the sole proprietor of a business so she closed LiberTEAS and started reviewing teas online. She met Jennifer through another blog that they both reviewed for and they decided to start their own review blog. This review blog!

Throughout her journey as a tea reviewer, she discovered 52Teas and became enamored with the idea of creating a new tea every week. When the founder of 52Teas decided he wanted to move on, he offered the business to Anne but knowing that she wasn't cut out to be a sole proprietor, she instead offered the company to her oldest daughter who employs her as the Mad Tea Artist for 52Teas!

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