Paksong Green/ Rakkasan Tea Co

A bit of a cold has taken hold of me. So I apologize in advance as my taste buds are a bit perplexed. This tea is reminiscent of other roasted greens with the roasted notes but the impact isn’t quite the same. It hits you like a light tap and then the entire flavor wheel just disappears. Not even an aftertaste. The light flavors are of asparagus with slight grassy undertones. The wet leaf smell, even with my nose somewhat clogged, is a wonderful wok roasted smell. You know that smell you get from a lovingly cared for, nicely aged wok? That homey vegetal scent. If you are a fan of green tea definitely give this one a try.


Here’s the scoop!

Leaf Type: Green
Where to Buy: Rakkasan Tea Company
Description:

Paksong Green is a large-leaf, green tea grown on the Bolaven Plateau of southern Laos. This fine green tea owes its character to the careful hand-processing of artisan farmers. After plucking and withering, the tea leaves are hand-rolled. Then a short roast on a wood fire gives the tea a subtle, slightly smoky finish with notes of baby corn, young asparagus and seaweed.

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!

Amba Ceylon Green / Rakkasan

Trying hard to concentrate on all the unique aspects of this tea while watching my son push our electric grill back and forth in the kitchen and screaming at it when it hits an obstacle; so forgive me if this post is a bit jumbled.

A green tea very light in flavor. With my first cup I tried to eat a cinnamon roll but the roll overpowered the tea. Unlike many green teas this one isn’t abundantly grassy. It may take a few cups of this one to truly begin to understand the flavors.

Sometimes I feel like I need to only drink one tea for awhile in order to open my palette to unique flavors. Drinking too many different teas at a time can impede this. The flavors seem to be mainly vegetal with hints of summer florals.


Here’s the scoop!

Leaf Type: Green
Where to Buy: Rakkasan Tea
Description: This is a unique pan-fired, hand-crafted tea that is part green and part oolong due to the unusually slow wither. It is also the hardest tea for us to get. Grown at an elevation of 3,300 feet, it has buttery caramel and citrus notes that layer with soft vegetal and fruity peach accents with a hint of mint.

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!

Six Borders Black (Vietnam) from Rakkasan Tea. . . .

If you could choose between mass produced or family owned and operated which would you choose? This tea is wild grown and plucked by a single family. As I sit here and look at neatly rolled tea leaves I can’t help but wonder what the family is like.

When I first opened the can I was hit with a sweet honey aroma. I’m not smelling it anymore but it’s on par with the honey like taste of the liquid. Along with the honey there are also some malt and slight chocolate notes.

This is the type of black tea that you need to try without anything added first. While I do think it would hold up well to honey and milk or maybe some sugar I do think it’s best on it’s own.

I made a medium sized tea pot with about 2 tsp of leaves. Suggest using at least 3 tsp as the flavor with 2 tsp was almost too light.


Here’s the scoop!

Leaf Type: Black
Where to Buy: Rakkasan Tea
Description

While Vietnam is better known for its green tea, Six Borders Black is a surprisingly excellent wild black tea from the high mountain slopes of Yên Bái Province—a region that borders six other Vietnamese provinces. Grown above 4,300 feet and harvested by a single family of H’mong farmers, this tea is full of character and flavors of malt and chocolate. It has a rich copper liquor.

About Our Vietnamese Tea

Vietnamese tea trees are some of the oldest in the world. While tea farming in Vietnam has existed for hundreds of years, 20th century conflict badly harmed the industry and prevented it from reaching Western consumers. Only in the last generation has the political climate in Vietnam improved.

Our Vietnamese tea comes from wild trees growing in the pristine, ancient forests of the far northern provinces of Hà Giang and Yên Bái. The tea is grown on mountain sides at an altitude between 4,300 and 5,500 feet. Tended by families on small farms, each tea selection exudes superior character and is ethically and sustainably produced. Our wild Vietnamese teas are organically produced and comply with international standards.

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!