Notes on Zhong-Shu-Hu Oolong Tea from Tea from Taiwan. . . . .

This is my second cupping for this tea. Though it doesn’t call for it on their website,

I found that this tea is better off if rinsed for a few seconds before the first sipping. Judging on the grassy flavors and marine mouth feel and I would guess this oolong to be on the lighter end of the oxidized spectrum.

The liquid is a light golden amber.

IT does have slightly bitter tendencies and can be too strong if brewed too long.


Here’s the scoop!

Leaf Type:  Oolong
Where to Buy: Tea from Taiwan
Description

Zhong Shu Hu oolong tea comes from the Zhong Shu Hu area of Ali Mountain (Alishan) – one of the most famous tea producing regions of Taiwan. The climate here is cool and moist with cloud cover and mists every day. These conditions are ideal for tea because the plants grow very slowly and produce tender, flavorful tea leaves and buds.

Zhong Shu Hu oolong tea has a sweet taste and refined aroma. Each brewing brings out new flavours and taste sensations. This tea has a complexity that provides continuous nuances with every cup.

Zhong Shu Hu oolong tea can be re-brewed several times while maintaining an excellent flavour. We recommend the Gong Fu method of preparation to bring out the best of this excellent tea.

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!

Takarabako Tea Farm: Organic Shimane Oolong Tea from Yunomi. . .

May I introduce you to…Takarabako Tea Farm’s Organic Shimane Oolong Tea…sold online from our friends at Yunomi.

Upon opening this package of loose leaf I thought the dried leaves were a little while and crazy for an oolong but I thought that was something that really set it aside from others, too!

It smelled a little airy and floral and grassy all at once. Much like if you were laying in the middle of a meadow while spring is blooming!

The flavor was comparable to a earthy green tea but had an hint of dryness and heartiness to it that some black teas have. It made for a very complex cup to contemplate. I guess you could say that it’s a ‘real thinker’.

This is the second tea I have had from the Takarabako Farm. The farm was established in 2003 as a subsidiary of the landscaping company, Matsuura-Zoen, Takarabako Tea Farm is located in the Oba Sorayama district in the southern part of Matsue City, Shimane Prefecture. The farmers conduct circulation type agriculture mainly based on tea and persimmon in addition to processing the crops and selling them directly to local consumers.

The president Kouichi Matsuura has five employees and carries the following Certifications: Eco-farmer certified by Shimane Prefecture, Organic certification of JAS (Tea, Persimmon) for agriculture, processing and packing, Local GAP certification by Shimane Prefecture, Excellence Award for the 19th Japan Environment Preservation Agriculture Promotion Competition.

For those who like unique Oolongs I would highly suggest trying this at least once!


Here’s the scoop!

Leaf Type:  Oolong
Where to Buy: Yunomi
Description

Takarabako Shimane Oolong tea is both thirst quenching like green teas and mouth drying like some black teas. It’s amazing how many different characters are connected in this tea to create something very unique. It’s more herbal-tea like than regular oolongs, very light with the actual taste floating somewhere in the middle of the gulp, perfect for everyday drinking in early autumn days or wintery spring. You can use the same leaves for at least 4 times. Love it.

 

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!

High Mountain Oolong from Qi Aerista. . . .

This tea is sturdy and sophisticated, like a sweater vest on a college professor who is woke to the kids’ causes. It is tasteful. It is educated. It knows how to reap the health benefits of green tea AND black tea.

There are notes here of plum, stone, moss, and maybe some algae, which I say with utter love and absolutely no derision. It’s earthy and wet and vegetal and a little bit juicy.

It somehow manages to make me feel like I know what’s going on. Like drinking it has made me a better person. Like maybe, very slightly, I have it together.

I do not, just to clarify.

I do not at all.

But the tea is very nice.


Here’s the scoop!

Leaf Type:  Oolong
Where to Buy:  Qi Aerista Tea
Description

Our High Mountain Oolong is grown on Xiyan mountain in Dapu county. This beautiful county is known as the Shangri-La of the Hakka world, where Hakka is one of the ethnic subgroups in China.

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!

Himalayan Black Dragon (Nepal) from Rakkasan Tea. . . .

If I told you this tea had it’s oxidization stopped at around 45% would you believe me? Yea, I wouldn’t believe me either. When I first opened the can and looked at the elegantly shaped ‘balls’ of tea I thought they made mistake. Then again I generally drink oolongs close to the green spectrum so who am I to talk.

As much as I stick my nose into this can to smell the dry leaves I just don’t find much. There is a very slight musty… earthy smell. The true aromas come out in the wet leaf. The first time I smelled it I detested it as the smell of cigarette smoke was somewhat lingering but this time it is very very light. Wet forest is now what I predominately detect. As far as flavor goes, this one is very unique.

Granted, there are lots of unique teas in this world. This one is unique in that it has the essences of darjeelings in a subtle way. (Darjeelings should almost be given their own classification instead of black). Anyway, flavors for this one primarily stay in the earthy range. Some grape hints here and there but no floral notes detected as is said on their site. Perhaps its a floral that I don’t understand. Summer meadow floral perhaps?

If you are looking to support a tea company for certain reasons like sustainability, environmental responsibility, good customer service, etc then you definitely need to look into Rakkasan, not only are they a great company but you will be supporting tea grown in post-conflict countries.


Here’s the scoop!

Leaf Type: Oolong
Where to Buy: Rakkasan Tea Company
Description

Grown in Ilam, Nepal at an elevation of 5,000 feet, this oolong tea combines the best of both green and black tea. The mature leaves are hand-plucked and then withered in sunlight, spread on bamboo mesh trays. They are then heated to stop oxidation at 45 percent. Afterward, the leaves are rolled and separated into a unique ball shape. The finished product results in high floral notes with a hint of grapes. Himalayan Black Dragon is grown organically, but it is not yet certified.

About Our Nepalese Tea

Grown in the Himalayan foothills, Nepalese tea is extraordinary. However, years of industry underdevelopment, coupled with a decade-long civil war, served to stunt Nepal’s economy. Development of tea farming in the country suffered as a result. Since the signing of a peace accord in 2006, Nepal’s tea growers have sought to share their product with more and more drinkers around the world.

Our Nepalese tea comes from small farms in Ilam and Panchthar, a region just 45 miles west of Darjeeling, at an altitude of between 5,000 and 6,000 feet. The region is semi-tropical and very sunny, but has abundant rainfall.

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!

Long Life Oolong from DAVIDsTea. . .

I had to go to work early today, so I decided I needed a little afternoon pick-me-up. I’d bought Long Life Oolong on a whim to help a friend get to $50 (free shipping! we’re cheap!), plus, I’m a huge fan of its ingredients (oolong! nuts! fruits!).

This tea is… I daresay… a peach! It has peaches and apricots, which are like 99% of the experience.

I can taste the oolong a tiny bit (sort of a light flavor, verging on the black end of the oolong spectrum), but it’s in the background.

I’m not sure I can taste the almond slices or orange peel, but they’re not touted as major features. I might have also gotten a spoonful that didn’t happen to have those ingredients. Sometimes teas taste different cup-to-cup, which is sort of confusing and frustrating, especially for a reviewer who’s trying to give an honest overview.

I enjoyed this tea hot, but there’s a little sticker on the site’s image that says “try me iced!” I bet this would be a really great iced tea summer pick. Or, I guess, hot-day-in-fall pick. Or anytime-at-all pick if you live in the South. I prefer my tea iced when it’s hot out, but what does one do when it’s ALWAYS hot out? (When) do Southerners enjoy warm tea? They must, right? If you’re from the South, speak up on your hot-vs-cold preferences.

This blend tastes a bit like Happy Kombucha , also a David’s Tea oolong with fruit. I think if you have one, you might not need the other, but if you have neither, this could definitely fill a hole in your heart. Or stomach. Or any part, really. It’s yummy.


Here’s the scoop!

Leaf Type: Oolong
Where to Buy:  DAVIDsTea
Description

A hydrating peach oolong with sweet apricots and crunchy almond slices.

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!