Anxi Gande 2A Iron Goddess of Mercy Oolong Tea/ JK Tea Shop. . . . .

Inception tea!

It’s tea within a bag, within a bag! I’m so excited to open this!

First bag opened. Second bag snipped.

Houston we have tea.

Tightly rolled balls of emerald and dark green.

No noticeable smell or at least nothing note worthy.

Tea and water into the gaiwan. I wonder if anyone does water first?

I don’t see that working as well. A very light oolong in both aroma and flavor. Orchid is the highlight for both. With slight, very slight vegetal and grass notes.

The mouth feel is silky. Like most oolongs this one re-steeps quite well.


Here’s the scoop!

Leaf Type: Oolong
Where to Buy: JK Tea Shop
Description:

Tie Guan Yin Oolong tea, also called Iron Goddness of Mercy(literally in English).

For this 2A grade Tie Guan Yin, it is light-roasted, enjoying very good light orchid fragrance. After sipping the tea liquid, you can still feel the good orchid fragrance in the whole mouth.

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!

Da Yu Ling Oolong Tea from Tea from Taiwan. . .

I am having a really emotional day*, so I decided to treat myself with the best option available: a bracing cup of tea.

*To be fair, most of my days are emotional. I am a person with a Lot Of Feelings.

This was a more delicate cuppa than I was in the mood for, but no fear, it is still quite the taste sensation.

It’s really LEMONY! Light, and toward the green side of oolong, and there’s a little bit of a sweet-n-sour lemonade twist. I feel like they could serve this in the South, maybe iced, and people would love it.

It comes from a place that translates out to “Pear Mountain.” I have this weird thing where I fear unfamiliar fruit (please don’t make fun of me), so I honestly am not sure if this tastes like a pear. But it definitely IS fruity. It’s got a surprising amount of extra flavor for a straight tea. Wow.

If you were to go to Mount Li, from whence this tea originates, you would be close to — and possibly able to visit — China’s Terracotta Army.

It’s a giant underground tomb-necropolis that houses a miniature version of the first Chinese emperor’s army. They protect his (still unopened) tomb. You really need to read the Wikipedia article about this. It’s fascinating.

 


Here’s the scoop!

Leaf Type:  Oolong
Where to Buy:  Tea from Taiwan
Description

Da Yu Ling oolong tea (wu-long tea) is a premium-grade oolong tea from the Da Yu Ling area of Taiwan’s Taichung county. Its high altitude (more than 2600 meters) makes this one of the highest tea plantations in the world.

Da Yu Ling has a wonderful fragrance and taste. It is a lightly oxidized oolong tea with a refreshing palate that is sought after by the most demanding tea connoisseurs. Da Yu Ling is produced in limited quantities and is one of the most prized teas of Taiwan.

 

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!

Rou Gui Oolong from White2tea. . . .

If Big Red Robe (Da Hong Pao) had a brother this would be him.

It makes sense being that they are both Wuyi Oolongs. This one is unique.

Of course all teas are but this one in particular has a unique scent. New car smell? Earthy, woody, new car.

A very delicate flavor. Hits your palette and is gone before you know it. It is definitely earthy but somehow hard to pinpoint exactly what earthy flavors I am tasting.

Smooth mouth feel and golden amber color along with the unique flavor profile make this a must try.


Here’s the scoop!

Leaf Type:  Oolong
Where to Buy: White2Tea
Description

This tea does not appear to be available now but click below for oolongs that are.

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!

Thoughts from our Sister regarding Fong Mong’s Oolong-Tan Xiang

Hints of chocolate and roasted nuts entertain your nose when you first open the package containing the tea. Beautiful, tightly rolled leaves along with twigs make this an interesting tea.

This tea roasted over charcoals but does not contain heavy notes from this process. Some of the charcoal notes can be found in the aftertaste but otherwise I find some slight hints of very dark chocolate, chestnuts, and earth for longer infusions.

In shorter infusions it is sweeter with some honey notes. . .  The wet leaves definitely retain the charcoal smell but not in a heavy obnoxious way.

If you aren’t familiar with Fong Mong Tea, we encourage you to check out their wide variety of teas and all of the amazing information they offer tea enthusiasts.  Suffice it to say, we adore Fong Mong Tea Shop!


Here’s the scoop!

Leaf Type:  Oolong
Where to Buy: Fong Mong Tea Shop 
Description

Tan Xiang Wulong, the hand-plucked leaves of Dong Ding Oolong are grown in the Dong Ding region of Taiwan at the elevation of 740 meters. At this elevation, the leaves absorb moisture from the surrounding fog and clouds every morning and afternoon which is ideal for Oolong plants. Due to the unique geographic location and stringent selection of leaves, this is the finest Dong Ding Oolong from the Dong Ding estate. 

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!

 

Yellow Goddess of Mercy from Old Ways Tea . . .

This tea sample came to me in a crisp, red and gold package with simple, symbolic instructions and the tea’s name: Huang Guan Yin or Yellow Goddess of Mercy. With a name like that, it certainly felt special to crack the seal on the red and gold foil and pour the lovely dark tea leaves into my teapot.  The dry leaves smelled faintly musky, like newly-turned earth, but were otherwise very mild.

I did a little more research on brewing tips beyond the information on the package and found that this is a wuji oolong, meant to be steeped for a short period of time over a few sessions.

For the first brew, the leaves quickly turned the water dark.  The brew smelled toasty and rich, like caramel and burnt sugar.  I always tend to associate oolongs with the fruity, floral, green notes, but then I encounter a tea like this, heavily oxidized, and am reminded that some oolongs can be just as bold and dark as black teas.

Upon further steeping, the brew has stronger sweet rice and breakfast cereal tones among all the toasty caramel notes.  The mouthfeel gets smoother with each steep, and brings out a oddly fruity note, a bit like raisins.  Beneath all these flavors there is a musky depth, slightly sour and reminiscent of tobacco.

This was a delicious bold oolong, rich and full of complex and tasty flavors.  Though the tea itself isn’t yellow, I still love the name, Yellow Goddess of Mercy.  Have mercy on yourself after a long day and have a tea session with this oolong to help bring you comfort and solace.


Here’s the scoop!

Leaf Type: Oolong
Where to Buy: Old Ways Tea
Description:

Also known as 105 this tea is a cross between Tie Guan Yin and Huang Jin Gui. The name Huang Guan Yin means Yellow Goddess of Mercy. This is the newest Wuyi oolong cultivar, having been introduced in 2003 by the Fujian Tea Research Institute.

Huang Guan Yin is interesting since in many ways it is one of the least traditional of the teas being produced in the Wuyi mountains. It is newly developed, and has genetic origins outside the original mountains. At the same time it is often packaged in a bag reading “Da Hong Pao” and processed in the same manner as the other Wuyi teas. The interplay between new and old provides for an interesting experience. Personally, I greatly enjoy this tea and when I can not decide which to brew will grab a bag of Huang Guan Yin.

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!