Rou Gui Oolong from White2tea. . . .

If Big Red Robe (Da Hong Pao) had a brother this would be him.

It makes sense being that they are both Wuyi Oolongs. This one is unique.

Of course all teas are but this one in particular has a unique scent. New car smell? Earthy, woody, new car.

A very delicate flavor. Hits your palette and is gone before you know it. It is definitely earthy but somehow hard to pinpoint exactly what earthy flavors I am tasting.

Smooth mouth feel and golden amber color along with the unique flavor profile make this a must try.

Here’s the scoop!

Leaf Type:  Oolong
Where to Buy: White2Tea

This tea does not appear to be available now but click below for oolongs that are.

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!

Thoughts from our Sister regarding Fong Mong’s Oolong-Tan Xiang

Hints of chocolate and roasted nuts entertain your nose when you first open the package containing the tea. Beautiful, tightly rolled leaves along with twigs make this an interesting tea.

This tea roasted over charcoals but does not contain heavy notes from this process. Some of the charcoal notes can be found in the aftertaste but otherwise I find some slight hints of very dark chocolate, chestnuts, and earth for longer infusions.

In shorter infusions it is sweeter with some honey notes. . .  The wet leaves definitely retain the charcoal smell but not in a heavy obnoxious way.

If you aren’t familiar with Fong Mong Tea, we encourage you to check out their wide variety of teas and all of the amazing information they offer tea enthusiasts.  Suffice it to say, we adore Fong Mong Tea Shop!

Here’s the scoop!

Leaf Type:  Oolong
Where to Buy: Fong Mong Tea Shop 

Tan Xiang Wulong, the hand-plucked leaves of Dong Ding Oolong are grown in the Dong Ding region of Taiwan at the elevation of 740 meters. At this elevation, the leaves absorb moisture from the surrounding fog and clouds every morning and afternoon which is ideal for Oolong plants. Due to the unique geographic location and stringent selection of leaves, this is the finest Dong Ding Oolong from the Dong Ding estate. 

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!


Yellow Goddess of Mercy from Old Ways Tea . . .

This tea sample came to me in a crisp, red and gold package with simple, symbolic instructions and the tea’s name: Huang Guan Yin or Yellow Goddess of Mercy. With a name like that, it certainly felt special to crack the seal on the red and gold foil and pour the lovely dark tea leaves into my teapot.  The dry leaves smelled faintly musky, like newly-turned earth, but were otherwise very mild.

I did a little more research on brewing tips beyond the information on the package and found that this is a wuji oolong, meant to be steeped for a short period of time over a few sessions.

For the first brew, the leaves quickly turned the water dark.  The brew smelled toasty and rich, like caramel and burnt sugar.  I always tend to associate oolongs with the fruity, floral, green notes, but then I encounter a tea like this, heavily oxidized, and am reminded that some oolongs can be just as bold and dark as black teas.

Upon further steeping, the brew has stronger sweet rice and breakfast cereal tones among all the toasty caramel notes.  The mouthfeel gets smoother with each steep, and brings out a oddly fruity note, a bit like raisins.  Beneath all these flavors there is a musky depth, slightly sour and reminiscent of tobacco.

This was a delicious bold oolong, rich and full of complex and tasty flavors.  Though the tea itself isn’t yellow, I still love the name, Yellow Goddess of Mercy.  Have mercy on yourself after a long day and have a tea session with this oolong to help bring you comfort and solace.

Here’s the scoop!

Leaf Type: Oolong
Where to Buy: Old Ways Tea

Also known as 105 this tea is a cross between Tie Guan Yin and Huang Jin Gui. The name Huang Guan Yin means Yellow Goddess of Mercy. This is the newest Wuyi oolong cultivar, having been introduced in 2003 by the Fujian Tea Research Institute.

Huang Guan Yin is interesting since in many ways it is one of the least traditional of the teas being produced in the Wuyi mountains. It is newly developed, and has genetic origins outside the original mountains. At the same time it is often packaged in a bag reading “Da Hong Pao” and processed in the same manner as the other Wuyi teas. The interplay between new and old provides for an interesting experience. Personally, I greatly enjoy this tea and when I can not decide which to brew will grab a bag of Huang Guan Yin.

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!

Caramel Apple Oolong V.2 from 52Teas. . . .

Charcoal baked oolong….interesting! Ive never heard of charcoal baked oolong before or seen it in any other blends so of course this was an intriguing blend to me.

The dry leaf of this one smelled like apple crisp! Once steeped, it smelled slightly grassy and like green apples. I’m not quite sure what charcoal tastes like, but I can taste a slight smokiness to this blend and i’m going to attribute it to the charcoal baked oolong. The taste also was slightly grassy like green tea and i’m going to attribute that to the oolong as well. As far as caramel goes, I could taste it as I swallowed and definitely on the aftertaste. But, cinnamon apple? Honestly I feel like the charcoal baked oolong and the caramel kind of overpowered the cinnamon apple flavor a bit. I really couldn’t detect as much of the cinnamon or the apple as I had been hoping for.

However, I did find this blend comforting and delicious regardless. It was perfect for being snowed in. I was also really glad I tried this oolong because now I can say I’ve had charcoal baked oolong! It just sounds so unique and it is definitely a must try. I saw that this blend was actually re-blend, as it was named “version 2”. I wish I had tried version 1 so that I could compare it, but I never had. In any case, I will definitely be finishing up my sample of this one and would recommend that you give it a try!

Here’s the scoop!

Leaf Type:  Oolong
Where to Buy:  52Teas

Some time ago, shortly after I started doing this thing as the Mad Tea Artist, one of my online friends suggested that I create a caramel apple Oolong and he suggested using a roasted Oolong base. I liked the idea but the thing was that Frank had already crafted a Caramel Apple Oolong using a Fujian Oolong. (Click here to read my original review* of that tea.)

So here is a tea that was previously imagined and then later re-imagined based on an inspiration from a tea friend. I started with a charcoal roasted TieGuanYin which is delightfully nutty and sweet. To this, I added a combination of freeze-dried apples: Granny Smith and Fuji (which, interestingly enough, are my two daughter’s favorite apples. Amethyst loves Granny Smith and Lilith loves Fuji.) I added some caramel essence and then – just because I felt that it needed some warmth, I added some cinnamon.

This is a tea that’s deliciously, apple-y sweet but also pleasantly spiced – with a creamy, nutty background of a truly delightful Oolong tea.

Taster size is approximately 15g

ingredients: oolong tea, organic apples, organic cinnamon and organic natural flavors

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!

Discovering Nunshen’s Oolong. . . .

G’day, tea-ple! It’s time for another foray into the Land of Oolong — a lush valley between the mountains of Black and the rolling hills of Green. (Disclaimer: this is not literal.) Oolong is like Doctor Who: it can travel between green and black at will. You never know where it will be. It will always surprise you.

Today’s pick comes from Nunshen, which has a really chic Bauhaus-style logo.

The pouch that held the tea sachet was made of a fine matte plastic that felt like a high-end business card. The sachet itself was made of a nice cotton/linen sort of material and had the stitching turn into the string that held on the tag. (David’s Tea’s sachets have similar construction. I was always impressed by those, too.)

I’m sharing this because I LOVE good design. It shows, right from the get-go, that these people care. (Well-packaged tea might not always be delicious, but you know that they had some meetings and they WANTED your experience to be nice, at least.)

The oolong that came out of this hella-chic packaging is surprisingly earthy. It’s like I momentarily entered the world of Helvetica/Bauhaus and forgot that tea existed. All of this smooth black-and-white sans-serif typography is covering up… plants for me to drink. RIGHT. I WAS HERE FOR THE TEA.

More than anything, this tea tastes like healthy cereal. The descriptor on the bag uses the word “oats” and “long.” I’m absolutely getting the oats. When I ran out of my own cereal once, I tried substituting my mom’s, some kind of uber-fiber keep-you-regular comes-from-the-earth blend. This is that. If you love oats and earthiness, this is for you.

I do not, for the life of me, now what “taste: long” means. I actually opened up and typed in “long” thinking there was some kind of secondary meaning. A Google search on “long taste” offered up a jumble of results, including one that mentioned aftertaste.

So I stopped sipping, and yes, I do still taste this in my mouth a moment later. So maybe they mean it’s a lasting flavor?

REGARDLESS, if you love some malty oat flavor, you’ve gotta get on board with this tea. And then report back to me on what you think “long” means. Please help.

Here’s the scoop!

Leaf Type:  Oolong
Where to Buy:  Nunshen

Get closer to nature with fresh grassy flavors and scents that will remind you of an open meadow in the spring.This blend is guaranteed to cœrce your mind and body to feel at peace and one with the Earth.

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!