Tsui Yu Taiwan Floral (Jade) Oolong Tea from Fong Mong

You can always count on Fong Mong for exceptional Oolongs. The aroma cup reveals some wonderful vanilla and orchid notes in the aroma as it is steeping.

A strange very very slight bit of asparagus hit the back of my tongue as I was sipping.

This is not a tea for those who prefer strong teas. The flavors of this one are incredibly light.

There are definitely some floral notes but if you swish it around in your mouth a bit you will also discover unique vegetable and herb notes. Be it ever so slight.

 


Here’s the scoop!

Leaf Type:  Oolong
Where to Buy:  Fong Mong
Description

Plucking from Taiwan peculiar Tsui Yu (Jade TTES #13) tea cultivar, in addition to stringent management of planting, Taiwan floral oolong tea was made by artisans to refine into traditional oolong tea. In the process of light fermentation, Jadeoolong transpires delicate floral aroma which you, tea lovers, won’t miss it out.

 

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!

Tie Guan Yin from Origins Tea . . .

One cold and wintery evening I decided to dive deep into my loose leaf stash and randomly choose one I hadn’t had in a good, long while. The one I choose from the heap was this Tie Guan Yin Oolong Tea from Origins Tea which I haven’t been able to locate online for a long time.

Some tea lovers say it’s a perfect middle ground to a black tea and a green tea but it’s actually an Oolong! Tricky, tricky…little fellow…but oh-so-comforting and satisfying!

Other tea fans say that Tie Guan Yin is arguably the most famous oolong tea with an aroma of baked bread with a floral, buttery finish.

I agree with both stances. It’s a little bit green, a little bit black. It’s not too weak and not too strong. It offers that semi-bakey, yet somewhat creaminess, too!

Could this be the Jekyll and Hyde of Oolongs? Perhaps! But for now…I will just call it a solid cuppa and enjoy it for what it is…Tie Guan Yin…a marvelous Oolong!


Here’s the scoop!

Leaf Type:  Oolong
Where to Buy:  Origins Tea
Description

Grown in the high mountains of the A Li Shan region of Taiwan, this tea is also known as the “Iron Goddess of Compassion”.  This tea will almost certainly become your favorite roasted Tie Guan Yin.  Nice deep roasted fragrance, comes off a bit nutty with the charcoal aroma, along with a bit of floral in the background.  Really nice mix of floral notes, fruity/herbal terpene complexity, and underlying roasted aroma.

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!

Golden Osmanthus from Perkse Coffee & Tea. . . .

This tea packs a wallop. Despite being a honey-and-flower blend, it has a sturdy, spunky edge. Its sweetness is balanced with just enough deep vegetal counterpoint to make you think “hey, this is a treat, and it might ALSO be good for me.”

IS it good for you? I googled it, and I found out that oolong tea benefits “are doubled because of the combined qualities of black tea and green tea.” Which is great, because oolong is my legit all-time favorite. Sometimes it tastes green. Sometimes it tastes black. It’s a whimsical, shape-shifting Loki of a tea.

This one in particular is more green in texture, flavor, and vibe, but that sturdy base is reminiscent of a black. Green ones are sometimes wispy. This one doesn’t fall into that trap.

If you’re a person that enjoys blends, I think this would be a great oolong intro. It has that much flavor.

I shall take this tea’s optimistic vibe with me on my trip today — I’m going to Disney World! DRIVING THERE. It’s sixteen hours. Oh MANNNNN. TEA GIVE ME STRENGTH.


Here’s the scoop!

Leaf Type:  Oolong
Where to Buy:  Perkse Coffee & Tea
Description

Golden Osmanthus (also known as Huang Jin Gui) is an Anxi oolong whose name means “Golden Flower.” A lightly roasted oolong our “Bolero” reveals an intensity with hints of honey and flowers you will find enticing and seductive.

 

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!

San Lin Xi Oolong from Harney & Sons. . . .

This tea tastes like eating a bouquet of nectar-y flowers. I have not, for the record, done this, but it’s how I imagine the experience might be, if you were so inclined. It’s light, lively, vegetal, and easy.

(Original Artwork from Super Starling inspired by this tea)

I feel like being a bee would be wonderful. A life spent in the sunshine, with a clear, tasty plan — find flowers; collect yummy pollen. Have a fluffy face. Hang out in Taiwan (whence this tea originates) with your friends in a hive. Hexagons are very hot in interior decoration right now.

Since I am not a bee (uuuuuuugh), I’ll have to savor this flavor instead.


Here’s the scoop!

Leaf Type:  Oolong
Where to Buy:  Harney & Sons
Description

We are pleased to expand our offering of Taiwanese high mountain (Gao shan) oolongs. This tea is from the middle of the Nantou District, between Li Shan to the north and Ali San in the South. It is a lovely lightly oxidized oolong.

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!

Milky Oolong from Tea Taxi. . .

When I first started drinking tea, I avoided oolongs at all costs. They were too floral or too green and just not for me. However, over the years, I have found myself more and more curious when it comes to oolongs, particularly milk oolongs which are often so simple and yet amazingly creamy.

This particular milk oolong, Milky Oolong by TeaTaxi, boasts “a subtle taste and a delicate aroma”. I steeped it per the package directions, letting the leaves steep for 3 minutes in 190F water.

At first taste, I found myself worried that perhaps this is too subtle. It came off a touch weak and not all that milky. In fairness, the “milk” oolong I had most recently prior to trying this was Oolong Creme by Sloane Fine Teas and that set the bar quite high. The more I drink, the more flavors I find. There is a definite smoothness here but I don’t know if I would go as far as to say it is “creamy”. On the other hand, I suppose “milky” is an accurate description as it is a little on the thinner side in comparison to the other milk oolongs I’ve tried. There is also a lot of floral notes here which to me appear as almost a shadow of the orchid taste in DAVIDsTEA’s Vanilla Orchid.

All in all, this tea is not bad, but also does nothing to stand out among the sea of milk oolongs. It came to me as a sample in the Generation Tea monthly subscription and the one cup is leaving me satisfied though I probably won’t seek it out again.


Here’s the scoop!

Leaf Type:  Oolong
Where to Buy:  Tea Taxi
Description

A subtle taste and a delicate aroma. This classic tea will make you feel as zen as a yoga session would! Namaste.

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!