Himalayan Black Dragon (Nepal) from Rakkasan Tea. . . .

If I told you this tea had it’s oxidization stopped at around 45% would you believe me? Yea, I wouldn’t believe me either. When I first opened the can and looked at the elegantly shaped ‘balls’ of tea I thought they made mistake. Then again I generally drink oolongs close to the green spectrum so who am I to talk.

As much as I stick my nose into this can to smell the dry leaves I just don’t find much. There is a very slight musty… earthy smell. The true aromas come out in the wet leaf. The first time I smelled it I detested it as the smell of cigarette smoke was somewhat lingering but this time it is very very light. Wet forest is now what I predominately detect. As far as flavor goes, this one is very unique.

Granted, there are lots of unique teas in this world. This one is unique in that it has the essences of darjeelings in a subtle way. (Darjeelings should almost be given their own classification instead of black). Anyway, flavors for this one primarily stay in the earthy range. Some grape hints here and there but no floral notes detected as is said on their site. Perhaps its a floral that I don’t understand. Summer meadow floral perhaps?

If you are looking to support a tea company for certain reasons like sustainability, environmental responsibility, good customer service, etc then you definitely need to look into Rakkasan, not only are they a great company but you will be supporting tea grown in post-conflict countries.


Here’s the scoop!

Leaf Type: Oolong
Where to Buy: Rakkasan Tea Company
Description

Grown in Ilam, Nepal at an elevation of 5,000 feet, this oolong tea combines the best of both green and black tea. The mature leaves are hand-plucked and then withered in sunlight, spread on bamboo mesh trays. They are then heated to stop oxidation at 45 percent. Afterward, the leaves are rolled and separated into a unique ball shape. The finished product results in high floral notes with a hint of grapes. Himalayan Black Dragon is grown organically, but it is not yet certified.

About Our Nepalese Tea

Grown in the Himalayan foothills, Nepalese tea is extraordinary. However, years of industry underdevelopment, coupled with a decade-long civil war, served to stunt Nepal’s economy. Development of tea farming in the country suffered as a result. Since the signing of a peace accord in 2006, Nepal’s tea growers have sought to share their product with more and more drinkers around the world.

Our Nepalese tea comes from small farms in Ilam and Panchthar, a region just 45 miles west of Darjeeling, at an altitude of between 5,000 and 6,000 feet. The region is semi-tropical and very sunny, but has abundant rainfall.

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!

San Lin Xi Oolong from Harney & Sons. . . .

San Lin Xi Oolong from Harney & Sons is an overly comforting tea that I have been enjoying as of late. I know I have said that about other teas in the past but with as much tea as we drink here at SororiTea Sisters it has to be something REALLY special to wedge it into that ‘overly comforting’ category.

It’s just one of those teas that you verbally let out an “ummmmm” or ‘yummm’ as soon as it hits your tongue and swishes around in your mouth. It instantly put a smile on my face.

Harney & Sons San Lin Xi Oolong is a Taiwanese high mountain (Gao shan) oolong. It’s from the middle of the Nantou District, between Li Shan to the north and Ali San in the South. It’s lightly oxidized yet sweet and buttery. It has a medium strength for an oolong and works well with multiple infusions.


Here’s the scoop!

Leaf Type:  Oolong
Where to Buy:  Harney & Sons
Description

We are pleased to expand our offering of Taiwanese high mountain (Gao shan) oolongs. This tea is from the middle of the Nantou District, between Li Shan to the north and Ali San in the South. It is a lovely lightly oxidized oolong.

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!

Rou Gui Oolong from White2tea. . . .

If Big Red Robe (Da Hong Pao) had a brother this would be him.

It makes sense being that they are both Wuyi Oolongs. This one is unique.

Of course all teas are but this one in particular has a unique scent. New car smell? Earthy, woody, new car.

A very delicate flavor. Hits your palette and is gone before you know it. It is definitely earthy but somehow hard to pinpoint exactly what earthy flavors I am tasting.

Smooth mouth feel and golden amber color along with the unique flavor profile make this a must try.


Here’s the scoop!

Leaf Type:  Oolong
Where to Buy: White2Tea
Description

This tea does not appear to be available now but click below for oolongs that are.

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!

Prince of Peace Oolong Tea. . . .

Let me start by saying that I am very skeptical.

This is the first straight oolong I’ve had that is in a tea bag. Not only that but the leaves are all crushed. It’s a tea bag so I know that is to be expected but still sad to see.

For those who drink a lot of bagged tea I can see this as something above say Lipton or Bigelow but still nothing above any loose leaf companies. Surprisingly the taste is not as bad as I thought it would be. It is an earthy oolong. Nutty and oaky in smell. Roasted nuts and wet forest floor are the predominate flavors.

Overall not that bad but if steeped loose I bet it would reveal flavors that are even better.


Here’s the scoop!

Leaf Type:  Oolong
Where to Buy: Prince of Peace
Description

Oolong is semi-fermented, combining the best qualities of black and green teas. Prince of Peace® Oolong Tea is completely hand picked, delightfully aromatic with a mild flavor and bright golden color.

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!

On Wisconsin from A Quarter To Tea. . . .

There’s a classic scene in Jerry Maguire where Tom Cruise’s love interest says “You had me at hello.”

Well, this tea had me at “cow sprinkles.”

My coworker is besotted with it! She had some with almond milk and thinks it’s the bee’s knees. She has made off with my sample. She describes it as “delightful.”

On the other hand, I’m not sure this hit the mark for me. I think this might have been better as a black tea rather than an oolong. The vegetal notes in the oolong are kind of distracting with regards to the “sweet” concept. I tried it both with and without almond milk and couldn’t love it while it was in my mouth.

The aftertaste of this tea is lovely, though. It’s a sweet-splosion.

So while it might not have been for me, through-and-through, it was still a novel flavor, and a molasses-infused treat for the morning.


Here’s the scoop!

Leaf Type:  Oolong
Where to Buy:  A Quarter To Tea
Description

A sweet and creamy jade oolong with sweet honey and cheesecake flavors and cow sprinkles straight from the dairy state.

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!