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Take A Walk On The Dude Side- King Dragon Oolong fro Wendigo Tea. . . .

When Nichole (Cuppageek) described this tea as “something to behold” in her round-up review of favorites , I knew I had to get on board. Therefore, when I found this in my packet of samples, I got right on it! This tea has a rich mineral leather/earth taste. It’s a far cry from my usual sweet teas; this is more of a dudely beef jerky/UFC fighter type of vibe. I daresay it’s MEATY. In fact, the very first thing I thought upon sipping this was “the manly side of the gym.” (Sure, you can feel free to say “everyone uses all Read More

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Watermelon Oolong from Gypsy Soul Tea Co. . . .

I’m not really a watermelon fan, you guys. I know. Have I even earned the right to review this tea?! Stick with me, and I’ll clarify– I like the FLAVOR of watermelon. Fresh, juicy, summery– it’s delightful. But something about the texture of watermelon gets me– it’s kinda mealy, super watery (duh), and while I love its natural flavor, it’s often super light and diluted, and I just wish it wasn’t quite so… subdued. This tea from Gypsy Soul takes all the things I dislike about watermelon, eradicates them in one fell swoop, highlights my fave (that tangy, fruity flavor!) Read More

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Himalayan Musky Thunder from Terrior Tea Merchant. . . . .

Not long ago I conducted an Oolong-a-Thon and did back-to-back tastings of all the oolong teas in my collection.  Somehow I missed this Himalayan Musky Thunder from Terrior Tea Merchant.  That’s because it didn’t look like an oolong at first glance.  Apparently, Himalayan Musky Thunder is a “dark oolong,” meaning it is more heavily oxidized than its greener oolong cousins.  Like other oolongs, I brewed this tea with cooler water (190 F) and steeped it a few times.   Upon brewing, the scent and taste of dark chocolate were very forward.  When you taste a chocolate bar with a high Read More

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Green Style Dong Ding (oolong) by Fong Mong Tea

Steeping specs: 3 grams per half cup at 175° for five minutes While steeping this tea, I didn’t observe much color change. The leaves unfurled quite a bit, having started out as small pills or pearls, but the tea liquid didn’t seem to change color all that much. However, after I removed the tea leaves, I could see that there was a gentle peach color to the liquid. It’s very light and transparent, not dark or strong-looking at all. What is remarkable, though, is the lovely roasted smell (disproportionately strong given how light the color is) and the high-quality leaves; after the Read More

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Alishan JinXuan Oolong Tea from Fong Mong Tea. . . . .

Descriptions for tea plantations are like works of art, describing misty cloud-covered mountains where finicky plants flourish. The words evoke vintage Chinese brush paintings where ascending mountains disappear into mist shrouds. This tea has a delicate flavor, a little bit vegetal, a little bit flowery, a little bit creamy. Soft and gentle. If you want a kick-you-in-the-face morning brew, this isn’t it. But if you want a gentle sunny-day accompaniment (now THERE’s a hard word to spell) this could be your new go-to. Why might that be? Let’s read: “Jin-Xuan is a special variety of Camellia Sinesis (tea plant) developed Read More